Kids and Money

Make Your Kids CFOs of Energy

January 9, 2012

The following is a guest post.

So, if you’re the Chief Executive Officer of the family, why not make your kids the Chief Financial Officers of Household Energy? Yes, you may not be able to pay them the six-figure salaries that most CFOs earn, but that doesn’t mean they can’t make valuable contributions to growing your family’s brand as the most energy-efficient household on the block. Why is this important? Most households waste a lot of energy through appliances and basic neglect simply because energy efficiency isn’t taught at an early age and isn’t viewed as a financial factor in a family’s net value. Are energy costs on the same level of importance as your collateral loans or bonds? Perhaps not. But in the long run, they can add to be a major drain. Here are two solid ways to deputize your children in energy efficiency in order to save money and educate them for the future:

When appliances aren’t being used they should be turned off. It’s astonishing how cavalier we have become about leaving appliances on, even though consciousness about energy efficiency as grown into the mainstream. Radios, electronic toothbrush chargers, computers, lights, TVs, seemingly anything with an electronic pulse can be invariably left on for weeks at a time without being used at all. This is an enormous expense and an incredible waste for the community and the Earth. Teach your kids to turn off appliances; make them accountable for that each night before they go to bed. Also, when you’re out of town, unplug your appliances. Most of them still consume trace amounts of energy even when they’re turned off.

Conserve, recycle, and reuse. When energy is viewed as a precious resource, a luxury, and not a limitless substance that can be wasted, it’s easier to be efficient. Conserving water, electrical, and heat use saves money and teaches your kids to be frugal. Challenge them to be as economical as possible, while also becoming champions of recycling and re-usage. Recycling should be a daily and weekly activity that the whole family can experience together. Reusing containers and products can be fun and creative. For example, instead of recycling all those jars, bottles, and containers, you can reuse them for sauces, paints, art projects or any number of household remedies.

If you teach your kids at a young age to respect the energy they use and to be as efficient as possible with it, you will not only be preparing them for a healthy, responsible future you’ll be saving some major money in the process. Making your kids the CFOs of Household Energy is a smart move for any parent looking to instill smart financial lessons into their children’s lives.
















  1. Great post! I stiill remember when my mom taught us all to take short showers and turn off the water when brushing our teeth. Unfortunately, I reverted to long showers when I lived on my own…I need to re-teach myself a few things!

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